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David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation

Save Black Rhinos on Black Friday

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At ‘The ART OF OPPORTUNITY Affordable Art Sale’ on Friday 24th November 2017

To coincide with ‘Black Friday’, a shopping tradition which started in the USA the day after Thanksgiving, and is so-called after the custom of businesses recording their losses in red ink but their gains in black, The David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation (DSWF) is holding an ‘Art of Opportunity: Affordable Art Sale’ both on-line and in their newly re-furbished gallery below their offices at Saba House, 7 Kings Road, Shalford, nr Guildford, Surrey.

The ‘Art of Opportunity Affordable Art Sale’ which will run on towards Christmas, will not only give supporters the chance to buy a selection of stunning prints at reduced prices from the charity’s on-line catalogue, but in addition a selection of eclectic art donated by artists and trustees from their own private art collections. In addition to more well-known wildlife artists there are items from esteemed painters William Russell Flint to Terence Cuneo. Proceeds from the sale will go to the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation, enabling funding of not only black rhino but a host of other species conservation projects across Africa and Asia which they fund in order protect some of the world’s most endangered animals.

Karen Botha, CEO DSWF said “This really is a wonderful opportunity to buy a wide variety of art to suit varied styles and tastes – not only for yourself but as early Christmas gifts for your friends and family.”

All proceeds after costs from the sale of each original piece will go directly to support the work of the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation funding vital conservation initiatives across Africa and Asia.
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Dr Brian May leads the plea for wildlife at Surrey-based charity fundraiser

Kerry Ellis and Dr Brian May 2

It was a sparkling night for wildlife at the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation’s annual Wildlife Ball

Hosted by The Dorchester in London on Friday October 9th, 300 guests mingled with celebrities to help raise over £150,000 for endangered wildlife. A stunning set from legendary Queen guitarist, Dr Brian May and singer Kerry Ellis - which included the premier of Brian’s launch video for Cecil’s Law and an acoustic version of Crazy Little Thing Called Love - was followed on the big screen by a heartfelt appeal from former Spice Girl, Melanie C, for everyone to play their part to help save wildlife.
CEO Sally Case
“It was an incredible night for wildlife,” says CEO Sally Case. “The depth of support that we, as a small charity, generate illustrates just how important wildlife is to so many people and to the sustainable future of our planet and all of us, where ever we live.”

Calling for supporters to be part of the generation that cares, David Shepherd’s granddaughters – the artist Emily Lamb and the Foundation’s event manager, Georgina Lamb - echoed the call for the younger generation to take up the baton to protect precious wildlife and wild spaces.
Sue Smith  - David's PA - with David and Avril Shepherd
Adding additional excitement to the evening were Mark King from Level 42 (who sang happy birthday to a guest raising £1,000), TV presenter and auctioneer Charlie Ross who helped command almost £60,000 in the live auction of artwork donated by the Shepherd family, British designer and supporter Elizabeth Emanuel, TV presenter Kate Silverton and Olympic gold medal winning rower Alex Gregory.

About the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation (DSWF)
DSWF is a small, effective charity funding key conservation projects in Africa and Asia working in partnership with local communities to find long-term, sustainable solutions to help save endangered mammals in the wild. Founded by wildlife artist and conservationist, David Shepherd CBE in 1984, the Foundation’s art heritage plays a key role in fundraising to support key species such as elephants, rhino, tigers, snow leopards and painted dogs. In 2011, DSWF launched TigerTime to help raise awareness and funds for wild tigers. TigerTime has a social media reach of over 650,000 on Facebook and 33,000 on Twitter and with celebrity supporters including Ricky Gervais and Stephen Fry and reach over 20 million with one tweet.

DSWF is based in Shalford, Surrey. For more information see: www.davidshepherd.org and www.tigertime.info

All images by
CPG Photography

Paul O’Grady on why he’s supporting the elephant orphanage in Lusaka, Zambia

Paul OGrady with Nkala courtesy Jill Worsley
I left my heart in Lusaka at the elephant orphanage. I was lucky enough to film there two years ago and I spent nearly ten days with the elephants there and in particular a baby elephant called Nkala. His mother had been murdered by poachers and he was a very timid little chap, he kept well away from all the other elephants – he was scared of them – he wouldn’t even go in the mud. He kept himself to himself and a sort of little bond grew between us and when something like that happens it’s magical because it’s a once in a lifetime experience. It is something I will never, ever, ever forget.

I got quite involved in the place, and to tell you the truth at the end of the shoot I announced to the crew, I’m not coming home…and they said you’ve got to, you’ve got six weeks of chat shows to do … and I said anybody can do that, but this is a special job, this is something truly special. And I’ll be honest with you, it took quite a lot of persuasion to get me away from the elephants and get me on to the plane home.
But I have never, ever forgotten them and I went back last year and my boy, that’s Nkala, has grown into a big healthy, hearty, jolly elephant and he joins in all the fun. When he first saw me again after a year I thought he must have forgotten me but he hadn’t … He was like a small child at a party, he was embarrassed and hid behind the other elephants and was quite coquettish, he’d peep out to look at me. Eventually, after about half an hour, he came squeaking over and we were pals again. And again I thought; this doesn’t get any better.
Paul OGrady in teh BBC R4 studio
The work they do at the orphanage is remarkable, the bond between the keeper and the elephant is truly extraordinary and we have to help, because in ten years’ time there won’t be any wild elephants left, they’ll all be gone, along with the rhino and that’s shocking. Absolutely shocking. So we have to do everything in our power to help these creatures and to help the people who look after them.
I’m writing a children’s book about a baby elephant and a little boy – I’m going to try and do it at the end of this year – be out next year – and all the royalties will go to the orphanage. So let’s all do our bit and save the elephant.

Since 2011 an average of 20,000 African elephants have been slaughtered each year – their tusks hacked off and shipped abroad to be carved into trinkets and decorative ornaments. In the wake of this continuing illegal trade, orphaned elephants are being rescued across Africa and cared for in orphanages where resources are stretched. The David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation (DSWF) set up Zambia’s first elephant orphanage and now supports its ongoing work to rescue, rehabilitate and release these precious animals back into the wild. At the time DSWF funds community outreach and education programmes to understand the importance of elephants to their environment and also funds anti-poaching patrols in Kafue National Park to ensure a safe habitat for all elephants.

For more information visit www.davidshepherd.org