BLOG
Surrey’s Premier Lifestyle Magazine
August 2018

Campaigners Swarm to protest Surrey Earthquakes

A swarm of twelve earthquakes has prompted a demonstration today outside an oil drilling site in Surrey. Campaigners are swooping enmasse to protest drilling at Horse Hill, and other sites in the south east linked to seismic disruption.

Simon Elster of the Weald Action Group said: "With oil and gas companies pumping hundreds of thousands of gallons of waste fluids underground, and others testing new wells, we are clearly seeing the seismic results." (1)

A group of senior geologists recently called for a moratorium while the earthquakes are investigated. In a letter published in the Times, academics from Edinburgh university, UCL and Imperial College London wrote: "A moratorium is urgently needed on hydrocarbon exploration in the area of Surrey recently affected by 12 earthquakes." (2)

In the last six month Surrey has felt twelve earthquakes, the largest of which was 3.1 on the Richter scale. According to the British Geological Survey, which recently installed earthquake monitors in the area, the earthquakes occurred 200-700 metres below ground.

Campaigners claim oil and gas operations are the possible cause, and are the result of the recent drilling.

Simon Elster said: "We call for an moratorium and and immediate inspections of all wells to ensure their well integrity remains intact."

In Lancashire a gas company admitted to causing two earthquakes near Blackpool in 2011. This led the government to impose an informal moratorium. The earthquakes were 2.3 and 1.5 on the Richter scale.

Weblinks:

www.drillordrop.com
www.davidsmythe.org
www.brockhamoilwatch.org
www.voiceforleithhill.co.uk

1/ At a drill site near Brockham, Surrey, Angus Energy recently injected 600,000 gallons of wastewater into a well, an activity linked to earthquakes in the US. Meanwhile at nearby Horse Hill, UKOG are currently "flow testing", a process that involved pressuring the sub strata to assess underground reserves.

2/ "Surrey Quake Fears", the Times (attached), letter signed by Stuart Gifillian, senior lecturer in geochemistry, University of Edinburgh, Stuart Haseldine, professor of geology, University of Edinburgh, Bill McGuire, emeritus professor in geophysical and climate hazards, UCL, Richard Selley, emeritus professor of petroleum geology, Imperial College London.

Times_letter-6aug18

The British Heart Foundation Opens New Home and Fashion Store in Kingston

BHF Home & Fashion Store 8

Local Mayor and Kingston University Professor join shop volunteers and staff at BHF store that will support vital heart research

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) has today opened its latest department store in Kingston, to raise vital funds for life saving heart research.

The new store at 10 Alderman Judge Mall opened its doors for the first time on Tuesday 31 July at 10am, creating new retail jobs and volunteering opportunities.

The shop is expected to be in Kingston for two years ahead of the planned regeneration of Eden Walk. The newly designed 17,000sq foot site will be one of the charity’s largest stores, hosting Home and Fashion departments offering a range of good quality furniture, homeware, clothing, accessories and books at budget-friendly prices.

The store will also be a local community hub, offering shoppers valuable heart health information, running CPR training sessions, and creating retail jobs and volunteering opportunities for people of every age – from school leavers to retirees.

The store was opened by local Mayor, Councillor Thay Thayalan who joined BHF volunteers and staff to welcome the local community for a first look of the great bargains on offer. Also in attendance was CEO of the Charity Retail Association Robin Osterley and Professor Tom Quinn who is currently leading a BHF-funded study to the best way to diagnose people suspected of a having a heart attack.

Tom Quinn, Professor of Cardiovascular Nursing at Kingston University and St George’s, University of London, said: “The British Heart Foundation is the most important funder of cardiovascular research in the UK. Without the money raised from their shops many vital projects would not be able to continue.

“Every 3 minutes someone loses a loved one to heart and circulatory diseases in the UK, but research can find the breakthroughs to beat those conditions. I hope that people in the local community will support this store and help it power the research that can save more lives in Kingston, and across the UK.”

Rachel Andrew, Area Manager at The British Heart Foundation said: “We are so excited to have this new and innovative space in Kingston, which we hope will become a valued addition to the town centre. If you are having a clear out in the next few weeks, we would love to receive any good quality furniture, home accessories, clothes, shoes, bags and books. Donating couldn’t be easier, the BHF offers a free and fast collection service for larger items and all money raised from the store will help raise vital funds for the charity’s life-saving research.

“If you would rather give the gift of time we are recruiting for new volunteers, who can spare anything from a couple of hours a week to a few days, so please get in touch if you are interested.”

Every item sold will help the BHF to raise vital funds for research into beating heart disease, including that undertaken at Kingston University to improve treatments for heart attacks. It will also help to fund the continued rollout of CPR training and public defibrillators in Kingston and support local heart patient groups.

There are currently around 14,000 people living with heart and circulatory disease in Kingston, including 4,000 people who have coronary heart disease and 2,000 people who have suffered a stroke. To combat these deadly diseases, the BHF currently funds around £500,000 of research at the University of Kingston and £130m of grants to Universities across London.

The store is located at 10 Alderman Judge Mall, Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey KT1 1BS.

For more information about BHF shops, please visit www.bhf.org.uk/shop

To book a free collection, call us on 0808 250 0030 or visiting www.bhf.org.uk/collection

Cranleigh Waters community river project launches



Surrey Wildlife Trust to recruit local volunteers

Surrey Wildlife Trust, in partnership with the Environment Agency and Thames Water, has begun a three year project to restore the Cranleigh Waters river, to improve wildlife habitat and river flow. With funding from Thames Water, the project aims to reconnect the local community with their river through monitoring and restoration days.

Volunteers from Surrey Wildlife Trust, the Environment Agency and the local community gathered to do a mass water sample of the Cranleigh Waters in July to obtain baseline ecological data for the project. With 20 volunteers taking kick samples, the sampling covered a long stretch of river counting invertebrates such as mayflies, which are a good indicator of water quality.

The survey found that while water quality was variable the habitat was in poor condition due to past modifications of the river. A healthy river maintains a channel that is constantly flowing however at the Cranleigh Waters the river is too wide in many places, so the river flows very slowly and drops silt on the bed which smothers the in-stream habitat.

In addition the steep banks of the widened river cannot support the vegetation you would normally expect to find which is essential for fish and invertebrates. Thick vegetation along the banks of rivers not only provides a wildlife corridor for mammals, such as, water voles and bats, it also prevents soil running off into the river, keeping pesticides and fertilisers away from the watercourse.

Glen Skelton, wetland landscapes officer at Surrey Wildlife Trust, said: ‘Our survey helps us to understand where the issues may be and develop a plan to enhance water quality with good river habitat management. What this river needs is some love, so by reconnecting the community of Cranleigh back to their river, it will give it the best chance of improvement.’

Adrian Clarke, Cranleigh resident who took part in the water sampling, said: ‘The river brings a sense of identity with the local village and a number of local residents were concerned that it was being neglected. So we are delighted to be working with Surrey Wildlife Trust to improve our river. It was an enjoyable day doing the mass sampling and we found a number of species: shrimps, mayflies, olives and stone loach. I had no idea what a caddisfly larva was before the training, it has been fascinating.’

For the next step Surrey Wildlife Trust would like to recruit local volunteers, with wellies at the ready, to regularly monitor the river and the wildlife that lives there. Volunteer training will be available in late August and early September. To find out more about the project or to volunteer contact glen.skelton@surreywt.org.uk or visit surreywildlifetrust.org/volunteering

£4,000 rasied at 80th anniversary fete

Owls, classic cars and topiary people helps charity raise £4,000 at 80th anniversary fete.

The Grange centre for people with learning disabilities raises over £4,000 at its 80th anniversary fete

The Grange charity which was founded in 1938 as The School of Stitchery and Lace saw hundreds of friends and supporters turn out to celebrate its 80th anniversary fete on Saturday.

Big attractions were the topiary people who were on duty to meet and greet visitors, the classic cars and motorbikes, and Owls To You, a display of four beautiful birds of prey plus stalls music from the Martinau Brass Band.

The fete ended with a mass African drumming workshop with over 100 drums provided by ‘Drum With Us’.

‘Our aim with the fete was to celebrate 80 years of providing care for people with disabilities in Bookham,’ said Grange Chief Executive Eloise Appleby ‘We were delighted that people were so generous.’

The 80th anniversary celebrations continue in Heritage Week on 15 September with the opening of the Heritage Room. The Room will feature textiles made for Queen Mary, letters for royal households and vintage photos.

The Grange is a well-regarded Bookham charity providing care and supported housing and a dynamic programme of skills training for 100 people with physical and learning disabilities. For more information please visit www.grangecentre.org.uk

Pictured below: Mary Anne, Ashley, our CEO Eloise Appleby, Vikky, Jo and Annie from The Grange charity
Group with topiary and EA

A voice for Leith Hill

Screen Shot 2018-08-02 at 11.51.13

Campaigners against oil drilling on Leith Hill have slammed the grant of an exploratory drill permit by the Environment Agency.

Over 103,000 people had signed a petition to the Environment Agency about concerns over drinking water pollution and two separate independent experts submitted detailed evidence about the risks.

But the Environment Agency has now approved the permit – subject to all other permissions being granted. Planning consent for the site in Coldharbour Lane runs out on August 7th and Europa Oil and Gas is in the process of applying for an extension. The Traffic Management Plan involving hundreds of HGV movements in the narrow and historic tree lined lane has been the main sticking point.

Julian Everett of community group, A Voice for Leith Hill: said: “It’s sadly symbolic that just before this year's Earth Overshoot Day - when humanity will have used more from nature than our planet can renew in the entire year – this permit has been granted by the government agency responsible for protecting our environment. The EA has decided to permit activities that will exacerbate climate change and jeopardise our drinking water supply in an area that is currently experiencing unprecedented levels of seismic activity.

“The EA claims activities will be closely monitored, yet despite several site visits they were unaware of an entire side-track being illegally drilled at Brockham - drilling that was conducted by the same company that now has the farm-out deal at Leith Hill. Instead, once again it is going to fall to the citizens of Surrey to do the job these publicly funded professionals should be doing: of protecting our environment and communal resources, and of upholding the will of local democracy”.


Europa Oil and Gas has spent ten years trying to get its permits for the exploratory 18 week drill but bitter opposition by the local community and local councils has meant that no drilling has started.

To sign the petition please visit >>> LINK